Electro-Mechanical Technology Required Skills/Job & Salary Outlook

Repair, install, adjust, or maintain industrial production and processing machinery or refinery and pipeline distribution systems.

Sample of reported job titles: Maintenance Mechanic, Maintenance Technician, Mechanic, Engineering Technician, Master Mechanic, Industrial Machinery Mechanic, Machine Adjuster, Overhauler, Industrial Electrician, Industrial Mechanic

Tasks

  • Disassemble machinery or equipment to remove parts and make repairs.
  • Repair or replace broken or malfunctioning components of machinery or equipment.
  • Repair or maintain the operating condition of industrial production or processing machinery or equipment.
  • Examine parts for defects, such as breakage or excessive wear.
  • Reassemble equipment after completion of inspections, testing, or repairs.
  • Observe and test the operation of machinery or equipment to diagnose malfunctions, using voltmeters or other testing devices.
  • Operate newly repaired machinery or equipment to verify the adequacy of repairs.
  • Clean, lubricate, or adjust parts, equipment, or machinery.
  • Analyze test results, machine error messages, or information obtained from operators to diagnose equipment problems.
  • Record repairs and maintenance performed.

Tools used in this occupation:

  • Hex keys — Allen wrenches; Hex wrenches
  • Micrometers — Inside micrometers; Outside micrometers
  • Power grinders — Cylindrical grinders; Grinding wheels; Precision grinders
  • Thickness measuring devices — Space gauges; Telescoping gauges; Thickness gauges
  • Welders — Arc welders; Electric welding equipment; Spot welders

Technology used in this occupation:

  • Computer aided design CAD software
  • Computer aided manufacturing CAM software — Extranet Machine Tools Suite
  • Facilities management software — Maintenance management software
  • Industrial control software — BIT Corp ProMACS PLC; KEYENCE PLC Ladder Logic
  • Spreadsheet software — Microsoft Excel

Knowledge

  • Mechanical — Knowledge of machines and tools, including their designs, uses, repair, and maintenance.
  • Mathematics — Knowledge of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, statistics, and their applications.
  • Engineering and Technology — Knowledge of the practical application of engineering science and technology. This includes applying principles, techniques, procedures, and equipment to the design and production of various goods and services.
  • Design — Knowledge of design techniques, tools, and principles involved in production of precision technical plans, blueprints, drawings, and models.
  • English Language — Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.
  • Production and Processing — Knowledge of raw materials, production processes, quality control, costs, and other techniques for maximizing the effective manufacture and distribution of goods.
  • Building and Construction — Knowledge of materials, methods, and the tools involved in the construction or repair of houses, buildings, or other structures such as highways and roads. 

Skills:

  • Repairing — Repairing machines or systems using the needed tools.
  • Equipment Maintenance — Performing routine maintenance on equipment and determining when and what kind of maintenance is needed.
  • Operation Monitoring — Watching gauges, dials, or other indicators to make sure a machine is working properly.
  • Troubleshooting — Determining causes of operating errors and deciding what to do about it.
  • Quality Control Analysis — Conducting tests and inspections of products, services, or processes to evaluate quality or performance.
  • Operation and Control — Controlling operations of equipment or systems.
  • Critical Thinking — Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
  • Equipment Selection — Determining the kind of tools and equipment needed to do a job.
  • Monitoring — Monitoring/Assessing performance of yourself, other individuals, or organizations to make improvements or take corrective action.
  • Judgment and Decision Making — Considering the relative costs and benefits of potential actions to choose the most appropriate one.

Abilities:

  • Reaction Time — The ability to quickly respond (with the hand, finger, or foot) to a signal (sound, light, picture) when it appears.
  • Control Precision — The ability to quickly and repeatedly adjust the controls of a machine or a vehicle to exact positions.
  • Manual Dexterity — The ability to quickly move your hand, your hand together with your arm, or your two hands to grasp, manipulate, or assemble objects.
  • Arm-Hand Steadiness — The ability to keep your hand and arm steady while moving your arm or while holding your arm and hand in one position.
  • Finger Dexterity — The ability to make precisely coordinated movements of the fingers of one or both hands to grasp, manipulate, or assemble very small objects.
  • Near Vision — The ability to see details at close range (within a few feet of the observer).
  • Hearing Sensitivity — The ability to detect or tell the differences between sounds that vary in pitch and loudness.
  • Information Ordering — The ability to arrange things or actions in a certain order or pattern according to a specific rule or set of rules (e.g., patterns of numbers, letters, words, pictures, mathematical operations).
  • Multilimb Coordination — The ability to coordinate two or more limbs (for example, two arms, two legs, or one leg and one arm) while sitting, standing, or lying down. It does not involve performing the activities while the whole body is in motion.
  • Problem Sensitivity — The ability to tell when something is wrong or is likely to go wrong. It does not involve solving the problem, only recognizing there is a problem.

Work Activities:

  • Repairing and Maintaining Mechanical Equipment — Servicing, repairing, adjusting, and testing machines, devices, moving parts, and equipment that operate primarily on the basis of mechanical (not electronic) principles.
  • Inspecting Equipment, Structures, or Material — Inspecting equipment, structures, or materials to identify the cause of errors or other problems or defects.
  • Handling and Moving Objects — Using hands and arms in handling, installing, positioning, and moving materials, and manipulating things.
  • Getting Information — Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.
  • Performing General Physical Activities — Performing physical activities that require considerable use of your arms and legs and moving your whole body, such as climbing, lifting, balancing, walking, stooping, and handling of materials.
  • Controlling Machines and Processes — Using either control mechanisms or direct physical activity to operate machines or processes (not including computers or vehicles).
  • Communicating with Supervisors, Peers, or Subordinates — Providing information to supervisors, co-workers, and subordinates by telephone, in written form, e-mail, or in person.
  • Identifying Objects, Actions, and Events — Identifying information by categorizing, estimating, recognizing differences or similarities, and detecting changes in circumstances or events.
  • Operating Vehicles, Mechanized Devices, or Equipment — Running, maneuvering, navigating, or driving vehicles or mechanized equipment, such as forklifts, passenger vehicles, aircraft, or water craft.
  • Making Decisions and Solving Problems — Analyzing information and evaluating results to choose the best solution and solve problems.

Work Context:

  • Wear Common Protective or Safety Equipment such as Safety Shoes, Glasses, Gloves, Hearing Protection, Hard Hats, or Life Jackets — How much does this job require wearing common protective or safety equipment such as safety shoes, glasses, gloves, hard hats or life jackets?
  • Face-to-Face Discussions — How often do you have to have face-to-face discussions with individuals or teams in this job?
  • Exposed to Hazardous Equipment — How often does this job require exposure to hazardous equipment?
  • Duration of Typical Work Week — Number of hours typically worked in one week.
  • Exposed to Contaminants — How often does this job require working exposed to contaminants (such as pollutants, gases, dust or odors)?
  • Sounds, Noise Levels Are Distracting or Uncomfortable — How often does this job require working exposed to sounds and noise levels that are distracting or uncomfortable?
  • Spend Time Using Your Hands to Handle, Control, or Feel Objects, Tools, or Controls — How much does this job require using your hands to handle, control, or feel objects, tools or controls?
  • Time Pressure — How often does this job require the worker to meet strict deadlines?
  • Spend Time Standing — How much does this job require standing?
  • Contact With Others — How much does this job require the worker to be in contact with others (face-to-face, by telephone, or otherwise) in order to perform it?

Interest code: RIC

  • Realistic — Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
  • Investigative — Investigative occupations frequently involve working with ideas, and require an extensive amount of thinking. These occupations can involve searching for facts and figuring out problems mentally.
  • Conventional — Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.

Work Styles:

  • Attention to Detail — Job requires being careful about detail and thorough in completing work tasks.
  • Dependability — Job requires being reliable, responsible, and dependable, and fulfilling obligations.
  • Independence — Job requires developing one's own ways of doing things, guiding oneself with little or no supervision, and depending on oneself to get things done.
  • Integrity — Job requires being honest and ethical.
  • Initiative — Job requires a willingness to take on responsibilities and challenges.
  • Analytical Thinking — Job requires analyzing information and using logic to address work-related issues and problems.
  • Persistence — Job requires persistence in the face of obstacles.
  • Cooperation — Job requires being pleasant with others on the job and displaying a good-natured, cooperative attitude.
  • Stress Tolerance — Job requires accepting criticism and dealing calmly and effectively with high stress situations.
  • Achievement/Effort — Job requires establishing and maintaining personally challenging achievement goals and exerting effort toward mastering tasks  

Work Values:

  • Support — Occupations that satisfy this work value offer supportive management that stands behind employees. Corresponding needs are Company Policies, Supervision: Human Relations and Supervision: Technical.
  • Independence — Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to work on their own and make decisions. Corresponding needs are Creativity, Responsibility and Autonomy.
  • Working Conditions — Occupations that satisfy this work value offer job security and good working conditions. Corresponding needs are Activity, Compensation, Independence, Security, Variety and Working Conditions.

Wages & Employment Trends:

Location

Pay
Period

2011

10%

25%

Median

75%

90%

United States

Hourly

$14.80

$17.95

$22.25

$27.68

$33.61

Yearly

$30,800

$37,300

$46,300

$57,600

$69,900

Pennsylvania

Hourly

$14.71

$17.84

$21.54

$25.99

$29.58

Yearly

$30,600

$37,100

$44,800

$54,100

$61,500

United States

Employment

Percent 
Change

Job Openings 1

2010

2020

Industrial Machinery Mechanics

287,100

349,000

+22%

11,710

Pennsylvania

Employment

Percent 
Change

Job Openings 1

2008

2018

Industrial Machinery Mechanics

16,250

17,550

+8%

400

1Job Openings refers to the average annual job openings due to growth and net replacement.

Note: The data for the State Employment Trends and the National Employment Trends are not directly comparable. The projections period for state data is 2008-2018, while the projections period for national data is 2010-2020.

Information provided by CareerOneStop, sponsored by the U. S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration