Electro-Mechanical Technology Schedule & Curriculum

MODEL SCHEDULE FOR ELECTRO-MECHANICAL TECHNOLOGY

SEMESTER 1
ELME 104 Mechanical Systems I 4
ELME 105 Manufacturing Fundamentals 4
ELME 107 Electrical Systems I 4
MATH 137 Intermediate Algebra 3
or Pre-Calculus (4 credits)
ENG 106 Composition I 3

SEMESTER 2
ELME 109 Programmable Logic Controllers I 4
ELME 116 Mechanical Systems II 4
ELME 117 Electrical Systems II 4
MATH 141 Trigonometry or 3
If Pre-Calculus (MATH 207) selected, then ELECTIVE
ENG 216 Technical Writing 3

SEMESTER 3
ELME 204 Mechanical Systems III 4
ELME 208 Programmable Logic Controllers II 4
ELME 215 Robotics and Motion Control 4
ELECTIVE 3
PHYS 213 General Physics 4

SEMESTER 4
ELME 214 Mechatronics Seminar & Advanced Project 4
ELME 218 Process Control and
Industrial Instrumentation 4
ELME 225 Computer Integrated Manufacturing
Sys & PLC III 4
Humanities Elective 3

ADDITIONAL GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS
HEAL Elective HEAL 106 or HEAL 111 1
ELECTIVE General Education Elective 3
ELECTIVE General Studies Elective
(only w/Pre-Calculus) 3

TOTAL CREDITS 74

Click here to download PDF version of Electro-Mechanical Technology's Curriculum


 ELME 104 (4 credits) 
Mechanical Systems I
This course introduces the principles and applications of the most commonly found mechanical drive and fluid power components in an industrial manufacturing environment. Topics include mechanical power transmission devices, hydraulics, and pneumatics through a fundamental level along with related construction and troubleshooting techniques. All course material is supplemented with practical hands-on exposure to the items described.

ELME 105 (4 credits)
Manufacturing Fundamentals
This course provides students with an overview of the various types of manufacturing that take place in the discrete, hybrid, and continuous sectors and of the jobs that must be performed within manufacturing. The course provides an introduction to the techniques and resources that manufacturers employ to improve operations, preparing  students for independent investigating and life-long learning. It provides basic knowledge and skills with regard to print/schematic reading, CAD drawing, measurement, and quality assurance. At least one plant tour is included as part of this course to provide firsthand validation of the topics covered.

ELME 107 (4 credits)

Electrical Systems I
This course covers the principles and application of alternating
current (AC) and direct current (DC) electricity, industrial sequential control, and electrical controls construction as found in a typical manufacturing environment. Topics include AC and DC circuit analysis and measurement in resistive, capacitive, and inductive circuits; AC fixed-speed motor control; control transformers, relays, timers, and counters; mechanical, pneumatic, and hydraulic input and output devices; sequencing and logic functions; introduction to component and systems troubleshooting; electrical wiring practices; conduit and raceways; and requirements for conductors, disconnects, and raceways as specified by the National Electric Code (NEC). All course material is supplemented with practical hands-on exposure to the items described.

ELME 109 (4 credits)
Programmable Logic Controllers I
This course covers the principles and application of programmable logic controllers (PLCs) as found in a typical manufacturing environment. Topics include understanding the physical components that make up a PLC, basic PLC programming, and understanding the components that take up input/output, including AC/ DC discrete input modules and analog input and output modules; how these modules connect to the PLC; and to output devices such as motor controls, variable frequency drives, valves, and other types of machine controls.

ELME 116 (4 credits)
Mechanical Systems II
This course covers the principles and applications of the most commonly found mechanical drive and fluid power components in an industrial manufacturing environment.  Topics include mechanical power transmission devices and pneumatics and hydraulics through an intermediate level along with related construction and troubleshooting techniques. All course material is supplemented with practical hands-on exposure to the items described.

ELME 117 (4 credits)

Electrical Systems II
This course covers the principles, application, troubleshooting, and maintenance of rotating electrical motors and electronic motor drives as used in industry. Topics include various types of single- and three-phase motors, various types of DC motors, reduced voltage starting, braking, DC electronic drives and AC variable frequency drives. The course builds upon the principles and applications covered in ELME 107.

ELME 204 (4 credits)
Mechanical Systems III
This course covers the principles and applications of the most commonly found mechanical drive and fluid power components in an industrial manufacturing environment. Topics include mechanical power transmission devices, pneumatics, and hydraulics through at an advanced level along with related construction and troubleshooting techniques. All course material is supplemented with practical hands-on exposure to the items described.

ELME 208 (4 credits)
Programmable Logic Controllers II
This course covers the principles and application of  programmable logic controllers (PLCs) featuring the IEC 61131-3 programming standard. Topics include how to install PLCs; how to configure modules; how to wire input and output modules, including temperature-sensing devices (thermocouples and resistive temperature detectors) and analog devices featuring 0–10 volts and 4–20 mastandards. The course also includes programming the builtin human-machine interface (HMI) which allows program control and status update through a built-in touch screen.

ELME 214 (4 credits)
Mechatronics Seminar and Advanced Project
This course provides a capstone experience for the associate of applied science degree in Electro-Mechanical Technology by requiring that students—with a teammate(s)—apply skills and knowledge from each of the program areas to an independent mechatronics project. Students develop and implement a project plan and budget approved by the instructor that demonstrates the ability to integrate the skills and knowledge obtained over the previous three semesters of study. Students work with actual industrial equipment and machinery in a realistic application. This course broadens students’ knowledge with respect to technology suppliers, equipment, and applications. It is strongly suggested that students begin planning for this course during the semester
prior to the semester in which the course is completed.

ELME 215 (4 credits)
Robotics and Motion Control
This course provides students with a background in the programming and application of industrial robots and general purpose synchronized multi-axis motion control. Expanding upon previously-learned concepts, this course examines the combination of multiple axes of motion to perform useful functions such as creating a flexible manufacturing system utilizing robots and broadens the knowledge of different programming languages to initiate and control motion sequences. Students learn how to implement electronically many of the simple machines introduced in previous courses such as gear drives, belt drives, line shafts, and cams. 

ELME 218 (4 credits)
Process Control and Industrial Instrumentation
This course covers the fundamentals of process control and instrumentation as applied in industry for the control of level, flow, temperature, and pressure. The concept of a control loop is introduced and each of the loop’s components— sensor, controller, and final element— are examined. Design, documentation, operation, performance tuning, and troubleshooting of single-loop systems is discussed.

ELME 225 (4 credits)
Computer-Integrated Manufacturing
Systems and PLCs III
This course guides students through the processes of interfacing and integrating manufacturing components and unit operations into useful systems. Students work with touch screen displays (HMI) networked to programmable logic controllers. System integration is accomplished using digital input/output, DeviceNet, and TCP/IP Ethernet networking. The course involves working with a flexible manufacturing lab that includes a bar code reader, vision system, servo, and AC drive to manipulate a conveyor and other equipment to sort and fill.